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Q1. What does Windmill propose for this site?
Wedged between Chaudière Falls and Victoria Island, the old Domtar industrial lands presents an opportunity to restore a historically-rich, but currently contaminated and abandoned industrial space into a vibrant, bustling, eco-community.

Sadly, the site has been inaccessible to the public for approximately 200 years. Initial estimates of the costs to remediate and restore the land and the waterfront is in excess of $125 million.

Our vision is to transform this derelict and fenced off property into the world’s most sustainable community, providing public access to sections of the waterfront that have been closed off for generations. It will be a new way for the residents and tourists from all over the world to experience and appreciate the natural splendor of the Ottawa River and the Chaudière Falls, as well as the culture and heritage of Ottawa’s Founding Nations: The First Nations, the French, and the English.

These industrial lands are part of a larger area considered of cultural and historical importance to the Algonquin People and many others. As such, we are fully committed to engaging with the Algonquins, ensuring their culture, heritage, and presence are integral to the development.

Windmill is recognized for being one of the most collaborative and greenest developers in the world. We believe that urban development and nature don’t have to be mutually exclusive, nor should people and their activities be separate from nature. It’s one of the reasons we have targeted the creation of North America’s first mixed-use One Planet community, one of the strictest and most rigorous sustainability frameworks that will guide the decisions we make for the site.

We are the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Dockside Green, a model sustainable community we built in Victoria, BC, was selected by the Clinton Foundation’s Clinton Climate Initiative and the U.S. Green Building Council as one of 16 projects in the world (across 6 continents) that demonstrate cities can grow in ways that are positive for the environment.

Q2. Does Windmill recognize the significance of this site?
Yes, we are very much aware of how significant this site is for so many people, be it the residents of Ottawa and Gatineau, the Algonquin and First Nations community, and even for all Canadians. It is often referred to as the ‘cradle of Canadian civilization’ and historians have documented that the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau exist in large part because of the Falls and the surrounding area.

Windmill’s co-founders are both raised in Ottawa, and the site has significant meaning to them as well. It is one of the reasons we are fully committed to ensuring that this project reflects the historical and spiritual significance of the area — and in particular, that the heart and voice of the Algonquin People is integral to the development, through culture, heritage, and presence.

The opportunity exists to work with everyone interested in the site to bring it back to its full splendour; to restore and ‘naturalize’ what is now an abandoned and contaminated site; and to recreate a vibrant meeting place where everyone can have access to the Riverfront. We also recognize that the Chaudière Falls have a special significance for the Algonquins and we are working with our neighbours, the hydro operators that own the land directly adjacent to the Falls, to ensure these can once again be experienced and enjoyed by all.

Q3. What has Windmill done to engage with the community to date?
To date we have engaged broadly with hundreds of different groups and stakeholders, and met with thousands of community members — well beyond any legal duties imposed on a private developer. This has included environmental organizations, First Nations peoples, local business groups, the two Cities, the National Capital Commission, heritage advocates, local politicians, Ottawa River advocates, and interested members of the public.

We do this because we believe it is part of our civic responsibility as sustainable developers, and because we understand that meaningful engagement will lead to a better outcome for this site. Given the complexity of this particular site, we realize that we can’t do it alone.

We have also been proactively engaging with the local Algonquin community since August 2013 to get a better sense of their vision for the site, and to learn about Elder William Commanda’s broad vision for the Falls, Victoria Island, and the surrounding isles.

We look forward to a long-term engagement with the residents of Ottawa and Gatineau and the Algonquin community, as well as with everyone interested, as we work to develop the world’s most sustainable community that reflects tangibly the culture and heritage of Ottawa’s Founding Nations: The First Nations, the French, and the English.

Q4. Will you be doing further consultation for the public to contribute?
Yes, we consider public input to be essential to the realization of our projects, and the ideas and comments we receive have always led to better outcomes.

We look forward to a long-term engagement with the residents of Ottawa and Gatineau and the Algonquin community, as well as with everyone interested, as we work to develop the world’s most sustainable community.

Please register to receive project updates and invitations to future events here.

Q5. Doesn’t this land belong to the Algonquins?
Windmill will be developing on 37 acres of land, of which 35 acres are privately-owned land and two are perpetually leased from the Federal Government.

However, the land along the Ottawa River, all of Ottawa and much of Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec is unceded Algonquin territory — this means that it has never been given away, sold, traded, or transferred by the Algonquin Peoples. Spanning over 36,000 km2, this unceded territory encompasses all of Parliament Hill, most homes in the Ottawa Valley, as well as private and Crown lands. This means that all of the residences and business in Ottawa and Gatineau which are on privately owned land are also on unceded lands.

Yet despite the fact that the lands are unceded, homeowners and private developers don’t have a legal obligation to consult with our First Nations when it comes to privately-held lands.

As private developers, we absolutely recognize the area’s special significance for the First Nations, as an important site in the heart of Algonquin territory. We know we have a moral duty and personal interest to actively engage with the local Algonquin community, as it is necessary if we want to restore the integrity of this development and achieve its full potential. It is why Windmill has been actively engaging with the Algonquins since the project outset in mid-2013.

Given the long history of the mistreatment of First Nations with respect to its people, culture, and land, our efforts have been devoted to learning how to engage in a way that is meaningful and that will lead to mutual trust. We will continue to listen and dialogue with the Algonquins, ensuring that their culture, heritage, and presence is integral to the development.

We have tremendous respect for the late Grandfather William Commanda, an internationally respected and acclaimed elder from the local Algonquin community, and the vision he expressed for the area. We share common values in terms of our respect for land and water, and for bringing our cultures together in a new partnership.

While the Domtar property doesn’t include Victoria Island, which is owned by the National Capital Commission, nor the Falls (the lands adjacent to the Falls and the ring dam are owned and operated by Chaudière Hydro and Hydro Québec), we believe we can help be a catalyst for a First Nations cultural centre on Victoria Island and we look forward to our continued dialogue with the Algonquins and others on this front.

Q6. Is there a legal duty for private developers to engage with First Nations?
Unfortunately, many developers believe that they don’t need to engage with First Nations because the law doesn’t require it when it comes to private lands. As a result, the conventional engagement approach hasn’t often resulted in meaningful partnerships with our First Nations.

Windmill believes, however, that the conventional approach is short-sighted and non-inclusive, and that it won’t work for this site. It would only reinforce a long and sad history of injustices, and go against our vision to integrate aspects of the three Founding Nation’s culture and heritage into the development.

Rather, we believe it is part of our civic responsibility to listen to the Algonquin community and to engage in a meaningful dialogue, so that together we can envision a better outcome for this abandoned and contaminated site. We are committed to being inclusive and transparent and to trying to do something different.

We aspire to create a new partnership with the Algonquins that acts as a spark and a learning for how different cultures with conflicted pasts can come together and build a positive legacy that rises above and inspires.

Q7. How has Windmill engaged with the First Nations community to date?
Windmill has been actively engaging with the local Algonquin community since mid-2013 as we recognize these lands and the surrounding areas are of great significance to the Algonquins and First Nations.

Given the long history of the mistreatment of First Nations with respect to its people, culture, and land, our efforts have been devoted to learning how to engage in a way that is meaningful and that will lead to mutual trust.

To the best of our knowledge, we are the only private sector real estate developers that have voluntarily engaged with the Algonquin Nation, and we aspire to co-develop what will eventually be recognized as a new model of cooperation between private-sector developers in Canada and First Nations.

There is no clear path for how this is done. It will require us to do things differently and think differently about how we engage.

To date, we have been incredibly inspired to learn that we share many common values with our First Nations, such as a desire to repair and restore the land, a passion for the responsible stewardship of the Ottawa River, and a commitment to cultural consciousness-raising.

We know that our work is just beginning and that much more needs to be done. Success will see the best of all our cultures represented in a vibrant 21st century community that gives voice to the Algonquin people, restores the land, cleans the River, and gives public access to the waterfront and Chaudière Falls.

Specific areas of collaboration being discussed as part of a draft Memorandum of Understanding with the Algonquin leadership include:

  • Formal recognition that the site is located within traditional Algonquin Territory.
  • Selecting a name for the site that acknowledges the tremendous cultural and historical presence of the First Nations in the heart of the National Capital Region.
  • Working with Algonquin translators to ensure that major signage onsite is tri-lingual – that is, in Algonquin, French, and English (the languages of the three Founding Nations).
  • Coordinating our planning efforts with the two cities, the NCC and the local hydro operators to establish an Algonquin cultural district and presence in the area, encompassing the new Pimisi LRT station, LeBreton Flats, Victoria Island, Chaudière Falls, and the former Domtar lands.
  • Explorations of options to allow for First Nations investment in the proposed District Energy System to be built on site, targeted to be one of the most sustainable systems in the world.
  • The hiring of Canada’s leading arts consultancy to study how Algonquin arts and cultural spaces can be integrated within the redevelopment.
  • The development of youth mentorship and internship programs.
  • The promotion of a First Nations workforce in the construction and operations phases of the project.
  • Support for and encouragement of First Nations businesses and entrepreneurs located on site, including discussions with a non-profit aboriginal daycare provider.
Q8. Are the lands Windmill will be developing leased from the Federal Government?
Windmill is in the process of acquiring from Domtar Corporation approximately 37 acres of land located on Chaudière Island, Albert Island, and along the riverfront in Gatineau. The property does not include Victoria Island, which belongs to the NCC, nor any of the land on either side of the Chaudière Falls, which is managed by subsidiaries of Hydro Ottawa and Hydro Québec.

Although Domtar privately owns the vast majority of this 37-acre parcel, the site also includes random and non-adjoining ‘pockets’ of Crown land located on Chaudière Island which total less than two acres of land. These ‘pockets’ have been leased in perpetuity by the federal government to Domtar, and will be transferred to Windmill as part of the transaction.

Q9. What is your experience working and consulting with First Nations as a developer?
We are extremely proud of the fact that Windmill Developments was one of the first private developers in Western Canada to work directly and proactively with the First Nations on a project called Dockside Green in Victoria, BC. Not only did the partnership lead to a better outcome for the project, it afforded Windmill the opportunity to gain first-hand experience in how to engage meaningfully with Canada’s First Nations community.

The conventional consultation approach used by private developers hasn’t often resulted in better outcomes. In fact, many private developers believe that they don’t need to engage with First Nations because the law doesn’t require it when it comes to private lands.

We believe it is part of our civic responsibility to listen to and learn from our First Nations, so that together, we can envision a better relationship and a new partnership for sustainable and respectful development in Canada.

It’s not an easy path we have chosen—while profitable, the conventional approach used by developers would be much more lucrative. We strongly believe, however, that developers have a responsibility to be positive agents of change, and Windmill is committed to changing the current development paradigm.

Q10. What is your wish with respect to the First Nations involvement on this project?
First Nations peoples in Canada have a lot to offer and a lot to teach us. Through our engagements with First Nations peoples, we have been incredibly inspired to learn that we share many common values, such as a desire to repair and restore the land, a passion for the responsible stewardship of the Ottawa River, and a commitment to cultural consciousness-raising.

Windmill is committed to sustainable development: everything that we do is conceived, designed, and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and its ecosystems. We are doing this in a variety of ways, and our approach and commitment to meaningful engagement is one of them.

Success will see the best of all cultures represented in a vibrant 21st century eco-community that gives voice to the Algonquin people, restores the land, cleans the River, and gives public access to the waterfront and Chaudière Falls.

Q11. Why does working together with the Algonquins matter to you?
We know that Windmill and the Algonquin community share a deep commitment and respect for the land, the Falls, and the river.

Our principles are not at odds with the Algonquin aspirations for this site. Today, the site is highly contaminated, fenced-in, and derelict. It has been an industrial heartland for over two hundred years and closed-off to the public, and although industrial operations ceased in 2007, the land continues to negatively impact the Ottawa River.

The world-class eco-village we are proposing is about recognizing the culture and the significance of the site. Clearly, the Algonquin community have a say in this project and must be heard. They have long been stewards and spokespersons for this land and we believe that their involvement can only lead to something greater.

We aspire to create a new partnership with the Algonquins that acts as a spark and a learning for how different cultures with conflicted pasts can come together and build a positive legacy that rises above and inspires others to be open to this new partnership between First Nations and non-First Nations people.

Q12. Why does this site need development? Shouldn’t it be converted to park land?
Currently the site is a series of vacant buildings on contaminated land. Sadly, it has been closed off to the public for approximately 200 years. Initial estimates of the costs to remediate and restore the land and the waterfront is in excess of $125 million.

In its current state, the site is almost entirely asphalted and many of the remaining buildings are dilapidated and in very poor condition. It is nearly bereft of all trees and there is little vegetation, most of which are invasive plant species. The land is highly toxic, with contaminants still washing away into the River. The waterfront is mostly made up of industrial materials, such as concrete, timber, and metals used to extend the property’s boundaries into the water. There are no rainwater filtration facilities, meaning that all the salt, toxins, and other pollutants run off uninhibited into the River with every rainfall or snowmelt. There is no vegetation along the riverbanks to act as a natural filter to clean pollutants before their discharge as effluent into the water.

The federal government concluded a number of years ago, when it initially explored purchasing this land from Domtar, that a mixed-use community development would be necessary to help pay for the acquisition, remediation, and restoration costs. In addition, given that the vast majority of the waterfront for kilometers on both sides of the River adjacent to these lands is green space and parks, governments are not prepared to use public funds of the magnitude required to restore this site and convert it into parkland.

Privately-led development is therefore the only feasible solution for allocating the necessary $125 million required to clean up the past and set an example for future generations.

The opportunity before us is to influence how that development occurs—in a sustainable and environmental way that reflects our community’s aspirations for the site, and that adopts leading-edge standards that will serve as a model and catalyst to influence other local, national, and international developments.

Windmill is recognized as one of the greenest builders in the world. We are proposing to transform this derelict site into the world’s most sustainable community, providing public access to sections of the Ottawa River and the Falls that have been closed off for generations. Our plan is to re-naturalize the site, providing much more greenspace than currently exists. Riverbanks and ecological reserves will undergo succession planting with native species. Invasive species will be removed to restore the richness and habitat value of authentic riparian edges. As well, streets and courtyards will include native and native-adapted species to help beautify the site and bring back its original ecological splendour.

Q13. What is your intention for the Falls? Will you remove the hydro ring dam and restore the Falls to their natural state?
There are many in Ottawa and Gatineau who advocate the ‘freeing of the Falls,’ which would mean the removal of the hydro ring dam built in 1908 that controls the River’s flow as it enters the waterfall.

It’s important to note that the land that directly borders the Falls is not part of the Domtar property being sold to Windmill. Nor does Windmill have any control on the electric generating stations and the hydro ring dam as these belong to and are controlled by subsidiaries of Hydro Ottawa and Hydro Québec.

That said, we believe we can play a role in opening up access to the Falls. As it now stands, the Domtar property is closed off to the public, and therefore acts as a barrier to the Falls.

We have been working closely with the NCC, the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau, and the two Hydro companies to find solutions and new ways to enjoy and celebrate the Falls. The broader plan includes providing public access with a new pedestrian bridge near the War Museum that connects the Ottawa riverfront to Chaudière Island, and that links to a public path to a viewing area on the south side of the Falls.

Chaudière Hydro and the NCC are working closely with the Algonquin community to ensure that Algonquin cultural elements are built-in to the design plan, and to minimize any impact that the hydro generating stations might have on the American Eels (‘Pimisi,’ a sacred animal for the Algonquin people) that live in the Ottawa River.

Q14. Won’t development on the waterfront be harmful to the River?
The Ottawa River is a critical component of this project and we are extremely sensitive to protecting it and ensuring our development is a net benefit to the River. That’s why one of the first organizations we spoke with was the Ottawa Riverkeeper (‘Sentinelle Outaouais’).

We have also engaged with the Algonquin community and look forward to their input on how we can better protect the water and the natural wildlife.

This has been an industrial site for hundreds of years. And although industrial operations ceased in 2007, the land remains contaminated and negatively impacts the River. The site’s waterfront is mostly made up of industrial materials, such as concrete, metals, and lumber, used to extend the property’s boundaries into the water.

There are no rainwater filtration facilities on site, meaning that all the salt, toxins, and other pollutants run off uninhibited into the River with every rainfall or snowmelt. There is no vegetation along the riverbanks to act as a natural filter to clean pollutants before their discharge as effluent into the water.

Our project will improve the quality of the surrounding area and help restore it. Initial estimates of the costs to remediate and restore the land and the river is in excess of $125 million. Our first step will be to decontaminate the site to remove the hundreds of years of industrial contaminants present on the site. We will also re-naturalize the banks of the river using native species.

Q15. Will you be limiting access to the waterfront?
No. Our intention is to dramatically improve public access to the waterfront and the Falls, from both cities.

Development along the water will be responsible and sustainable. We envision giving the public access to the water in two ways: along a multi-use network of paths built on naturalized green space (for e.g., the continuation of the bike path along the river in Gatineau); and also in an urban fashion with patios and restaurants — this is currently a rare experience in the National Capital Region, which is surrounded by water.

We have already consulted with the Ottawa Riverkeeper and plan to continue to involve her in our planning process.

We also know that the Falls and the River are important to the Algonquin community. We have engaged with both the Hydro generators that own the land directly adjacent to the Falls and the Algonquins and we are working to ensure the Falls can once again be experienced and enjoyed by all.

Q16. What will you be doing to protect the heritage aspects of this site?
One of our eight development principles that will guide this project deals with heritage. We’re currently studying all the existing buildings to assess: potential heritage uses; their condition; and how much it would take to bring them back up to a usable state. We would like to celebrate as much heritage as we can.

We do know that it will be very expensive to bring these structures back to compliance with the building code, and given that, we are very open to ideas and partnerships with heritage groups or others that can help us bring these buildings back.

Q17. How will you deal with the interprovincial issues arising from the property?
This project will certainly be challenging. That said, we are very pleased and grateful for the support we have received already from Mayor Pedneaud-Jobin, Mayor Watson, members of both councils, and the National Capital Commission. We hope that this project can serve as a template for how all jurisdictions can work together on transformative projects in the National Capital Region.
Q18. What are the timeframes for this project?
The site is planned to be constructed in six phases over a ten to fifteen year period. Our first phase is planned for Gatineau, and will focus on cleaning the land, repurposing the salvageable heritage buildings, and constructing new mixed-use developments.

Each phase is expected to last approximately two to three years.

Q19. What does success look like in this regard?
Ideally this project will positively engage both settlers to Canada and First Nations peoples who care about the environment, sustainability, and how it manifests in the reality of today’s society. We believe that there is tremendous opportunity for the heart and voice of the Algonquin People to be integral to the development, through culture, heritage, and presence in one of the world’s leading eco-communities.

We also aspire to create a new partnership with the Algonquins that acts as a spark and a learning for how different cultures with conflicted pasts can come together and build a positive legacy that rises above and inspires others.

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Gatineau approves rezoning application; construction to start in 2015

Ottawa, November 20, 2014 – Windmill Development Group has received the green light to proceed with its plans to transform the former Domtar lands into an accessible and breathtaking sustainability showpiece for the region.

At their Council meeting Tuesday evening, Ville de Gatineau councillors unanimously approved Windmill’s redevelopment plans for the Brownfield site, which straddles Chaudière and Albert Islands and the adjacent riverfront in downtown Gatineau. Ottawa City Council approved Windmill’s plans on October 8th.

“We couldn’t be happier with the Council’s reaction to our proposal,” said Rodney Wilts, Partner, Windmill Development Group. “We’ve been very encouraged by the support from the Council and planning staff.”

Over the past year, Windmill has embarked on possibly the most exhaustive consultative process for any private-sector led development in the history of the City, including welcoming close to 2,000 Gatineau and Ottawa residents to three open house events.

“The public and stakeholders have truly embraced our vision for a world-class sustainable community that is accessible to all, and respectful of its beautiful surroundings and unique heritage,” said Wilts. “We cannot wait to see our vision come to life.”

Next steps for the project include site decontamination and the launch of the sales centre in the spring. Construction is expected to begin in 2015.

Key dates and milestones

  • Windmill Development Group signs an agreement to purchase the Ottawa and Gatineau lands from Domtar – December 4, 2013
  • Windmill and Algonquin College sign an MOU to ensure a student role in the new community’s development – April 10th, 2014.
  • Ottawa City Council approves rezoning – October 8th, 2014.
  • Gatineau City Council unanimously approves rezoning – November 17, 2014.

About Windmill

Windmill is a visionary company dedicated to transforming conventional development practices by ensuring that exemplary ecological, social and financial returns are achieved in all their projects. Every Windmill development is conceived, designed and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and our ecosystem. Windmill is the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Completed projects include The Currents, a performing arts centre and modern condominium tower in Ottawa’s Wellington West neighbourhood, and Dockside Green, a model sustainable community in Victoria that was named one of 16 Clinton Climate Initiative Climate Positive developments.

For information:

Annie Boucher
613.863.3702
boucher@fusecommunications.ca

 

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Ottawa, October 30, 2014 – La Ville de Gatineau and Windmill Development Group are inviting the public to attend an Open House to view plans for the former Domtar lands, Thursday, November 13 from 4:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. followed by a public assembly beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Through historically and environmentally sensitive redevelopment, Windmill, one of Canada’s greenest developers, plans to build the world’s most sustainable community on the Chaudière and Albert Islands, and downtown Gatineau riverfront.

“This will be the last public consultation meeting before our development application goes to Gatineau Council in Gatineau,” said Rodney Wilts, Partner, Windmill Development Group. “We’ve been thrilled with the turnout at our other public consultations, and look forward to the opportunity to meet with Gatineau residents and stakeholders to hear their thoughts on our plans.”

Ottawa City Councillors approved Windmill’s rezoning application for the former Domtar lands on October 8th, 2014.

Additional information on the application to the Ville de Gatineau can be found on the website
The event is open to media.

To register for the Open House, please visit: www.the-isles.ca or www.les-iles.ca

Detailed schedule
4:00 – 7:00 p.m. – The public can view displays of the Chaudière Redevelopment project and meet with Windmill officials.
Location: Agora at La Maison du Citoyen, 25, rue Laurier, Gatineau

7:00 – 8:00 p.m. – The public is invited to comment on the plans and ask questions of a panel that will include Gatineau City Councillors, and Jeff Westeinde from Windmill Development Group.
Location: Salle des Fêtes, La Maison du Citoyen, 25, rue Laurier, Gatineau

Key facts/dates

  • Windmill Development Group signed an agreement to purchase the Ottawa and Gatineau lands from Domtar on December 4, 2013
  • More than 900 people attended Windmill’s first public consultation was held at the Canadian Museum of Civilization on December 11, 2013.
  • Windmill’s development applications were submitted to the City of Ottawa and la Ville de Gatineau on April 22nd, 2014.
  • Close to 300 people attended the second public consultation on June 24, 2014 at the Canadian War Museum.
  • Ottawa City Council approved rezoning for the former Domtar Lands on October 8th, 2014.

About Windmill

Windmill is a visionary company dedicated to transforming conventional development practices by ensuring that exemplary ecological, social and financial returns are achieved in all their projects. Every Windmill development is conceived, designed and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and our ecosystem. Windmill is the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Completed projects include The Currents, a performing arts centre and modern condominium tower in Ottawa’s Wellington West neighbourhood, and Dockside Green, a model sustainable community in Victoria that was named one of 16 Clinton Climate Initiative Climate Positive developments.

 
For information:
Annie Boucher
613.863.3702
boucher@fusecommunications.ca

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Ottawa, October 27, 2014 – Ottawa-based Windmill Developments are again proving they are leaders when it comes to reimagining how people live and work in downtown Ottawa.

The visionary green developers have announced they are building Ottawa’s first and only Class A commercial condominium tower in the heart of downtown Ottawa next to their Cathedral Hill residential condo building.

Located in the heart of Ottawa Centre’s EcoDistrict on the leading edge of downtown, the office condos will provide businesses and not-for-profits the unique opportunity to build equity with money that would otherwise disappear paying rent for office space.

“We spend a lot of time looking at best practices and imagining better ways for people to live and work,” said Rodney Wilts, Partner, Windmill Developments. “Giving professional practices and associations a way to build future equity by owning space in one of the downtown’s most desirable areas is a win-win for us and the businesses.”

While world-class cities like Chicago, New York and Toronto have embraced the office condo concept, the 14-floor Cathedral Hill office tower will be Ottawa’s first executive office condo building. Even more impressive, Windmill aims to make it one of Ottawa’s greenest buildings.

“As always, we are focused on high sustainability and performance goals with this project,” says Wilts. “We plan to use the best technologies and materials to not only make this building healthier for the owners and their employees, but more efficient and enduring.”

Key features

In addition to offering some of Ottawa’s most stunning views, including the Ottawa River, Gatineau Hills, Lebreton Flats and Windmill’s own Chaudière redevelopment project the building will feature:

Windmill’s trademark energy efficient and sustainable design, resulting in reduced energy costs for the owners, as well as a healthy work environment for employees.

Proximity to amenities such as restaurants, the Parliamentary precinct, and national institutions.

A 95% walkability score, plus one of the city’s best access to Ottawa’s public transportation hub, including bike routes and the future LRT (light rail transit).

Customizable floor plans, shared boardrooms, common showers and secure bike parking, among other amenities.

The units start at $187,000. For information, visit www.whylease.ca

Launch event
The public and the media are invited to join Windmill for the launch of this unique landmark office condominium:

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014
5:00 pm – 7:30 PM
Rideau Club, Pearson Room
99 Bank Street, 15th Floor

To register: www.whylease.ca

About Windmill

Windmill is a visionary company dedicated to transforming conventional development practices by ensuring that exemplary ecological, social and financial returns are achieved in all their projects. Every Windmill development is conceived, designed and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and our ecosystem. Windmill is the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Completed projects include The Currents, a performing arts centre and modern condominium tower in Ottawa’s Wellington West neighbourhood, and Dockside Green, a model sustainable community in Victoria that was named one of 16 Clinton Climate Initiative Climate Positive developments.
 
For information:
Annie Boucher
613.863.3702
boucher@fusecommunications.ca

www.whylease.ca

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 Windmill Development Group joins North American “Target Cities” program, heralding a new era of urban leadership

The National Capital Region has joined an elite group of North American cities in committing to become an example of sustainability through its Chaudière islands redevelopment project, which will emphasize environmental performance, social equity, and economic growth.

Ottawa, June 24, 2014. Windmill Development Group today announced it will participate in Target Cities, a two-year partnership of nine development projects across seven North American cities designed to amplify and accelerate district-scale community regeneration and create replicable models for next-generation urban revitalization. EcoDistricts, the Portland, Oregon, nonprofit behind TargetCities announced the new partnership today as a commitment at CGI America, a program of the Clinton Global Initiative.

Through historically and environmentally sensitive redevelopment, Windmill, one of Canada’s greenest developers, plans to redevelop the industrial lands on the Chaudière and Albert Islands, and in downtown Gatineau to build one of the world’s most sustainable community in the heart of the national capital region.

“The redevelopment of these industrial brownfield lands will change the face of the nation’s capital,” said Rodney Wilts, Partner, Windmill Development Group. “We are reinventing this once bustling industrial district into one of the world’s most sustainable riverfront communities, where thousands of people will live, work, play and learn, right in the heart of the nation’s capital.”

As a Target Cities project, the Chaudière islands project will incorporate the central principles behind the EcoDistricts Protocol, which guides the projects through district organization and governance, assessment, implementation, and monitoring. Each step of the EcoDistricts approach is built around an interrelated set of environmental, economic, and social performance areas: energy; equitable development; health and wellbeing; community identity; transportation; water; habitat and ecosystem functionality; and optimized materials management.

“Our plans include the preservation of heritage buildings, the creation of parks and public access to the waterfront, including the breathtaking Chaudière falls, fenced off for over 100 years,” said Wilts. “What’s more, this community will put Ottawa on the map as a model for sustainable communities.”

In addition to the redevelopment of the Chaudière islands, there are projects in Atlanta, Boston, Cambridge, Denver, Los Angeles, and three in Washington, D.C. EcoDistricts will act as a strategic partner to each of the project teams, helping them build robust governance models that will spur deep political and technical change, perform integrated assessment and goal setting tasks and accelerate the deployment of strategies to deepen their impact. As part of their participation in Target Cities, each of the projects will help test and refine the emerging EcoDistricts Protocol.

Windmill Press Contacts:

 Annie Boucher at 613-863-3702 or boucher@fusecommunications.ca

About EcoDistricts

EcoDistricts is a Portland, Oregon, based nonprofit organization dedicating to inspiring every city to remake itself from the neighborhood up. EcoDistricts provides cities with the tools and resources to transform their local focus into far-reaching, systemic change. The organization also delivers targeted training programs and facilitates leadership networks to ensure that emerging best practices for urban sustainability achieve have their maximum potential impact. To learn more, visit ecodistricts.org.

 EcoDistricts Press Contacts:

Rob Bennett at 503-719-2487 or rob@ecodistricts.org

Adam Beck at 503-367-1108 or adam@ecodistricts.org

Gina Binole (GBM Communications) at 503.797.4929 or gina@gbmcommunications.com

 

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Le Groupe Développements Windmill adhère au programme nord-américain Target Cities, ce qui lancera une nouvelle ère de leadership urbain

La région de la capitale nationale s’est jointe à un groupe d’élite de villes nord-américaines en s’engageant à devenir un exemple de durabilité par l’intermédiaire du projet de réaménagement des îles Chaudière et Albert, qui met l’accent sur la performance environnementale, l’équité sociale et la croissance économique.

 Ottawa, 24 juin 2014 – Le Groupe Développements Windmill a annoncé aujourd’hui qu’il participera au programme Target Cities, un partenariat biennal comprenant neuf projets d’aménagement dans sept villes nord-américaines et visant à augmenter et accélérer la régénération communautaire à l’échelle des districts ainsi qu’à créer des modèles reproductibles pour la prochaine génération de projets de revitalisation urbaine. EcoDistricts, l’organisme à but non lucratif de Portland (Oregon) qui a instauré le programme TargetCities, a annoncé le nouveau partenariat aujourd’hui en guise d’engagement dans le cadre de la CGI America, un programme de la Clinton Global Initiative.

Par l’intermédiaire d’un nouveau développement immobilier soucieux de l’histoire et de l’environnement, Windmill, un des promoteurs immobiliers les plus écologiques du Canada, envisage de réaménager les terrains industriels situés sur les îles Chaudière et Albert ainsi qu’aux abords de la rivière des Outaouais près du centre-ville de Gatineau, afin de construire la communauté la plus durable au monde au cœur de la capitale nationale.

« Le réaménagement de ces friches industrielles transformera le visage de la capitale nationale », indique Rodney Wilts, associé chez Windmill. « Nous réinventons ce district qui a autrefois été le centre industriel de la région en l’une des communautés riveraines les plus durables au monde, où des milliers de personnes vivront, travailleront, se divertiront et apprendront, au cœur même de la capitale nationale. »

Comme il fait partie du programme Target Cities, le projet des îles Chaudière et Albert intégrera les principes directeurs du protocole d’EcoDistricts, qui oriente les projets en ce qui concerne l’organisation et la gouvernance, l’évaluation, la mise en œuvre et la surveillance des districts choisis. Chaque étape de l’approche d’EcoDistricts est établie en fonction d’un ensemble de facteurs environnementaux, économiques et sociaux interreliés : énergie; aménagement équitable; santé et bien-être; identité communautaire; transport; eau; fonctionnalité des habitats et des écosystèmes; et gestion optimale des matériaux.

« Nos plans prennent en considération la préservation des immeubles patrimoniaux, la création de parcs et de lieux publics donnant accès aux rives, notamment les spectaculaires chutes Chaudière, qui sont fermées au public depuis plus de 100 ans », mentionne M. Wilts. « De plus, cette communauté mettra Ottawa à l’avant-plan à titre de modèle de communauté durable ».

En plus du projet de réaménagement des îles Chaudière et Albert, il y a également un projet à Atlanta, un à Boston, un à Cambridge, un à Denver, un à Los Angeles et trois à Washington (D.C.). EcoDistricts agira à titre de partenaire stratégique pour chaque équipe de projet : l’organisme les aidera à créer des modèles de gouvernance efficaces qui provoqueront des changements importants d’ordre politique et technique, à effectuer des évaluations intégrées et des tâches permettant d’atteindre les objectifs ainsi qu’à accélérer la mise en place des stratégies afin d’en augmenter l’incidence. Chaque projet du programme Target Cities permettra de mettre à l’essai et de peaufiner le nouveau protocole d’EcoDistricts.

Personne-ressource de Windmill pour les médias :

Annie Boucher, au 613-863-3702 ou à l’adresse boucher@fusecommunications.ca

Au sujet d’EcoDistricts

EcoDistricts est un organisme à but non lucratif de Portland (Oregon) qui tient à inspirer chaque ville à se renouveler à partir de ses quartiers. EcoDistricts fournit aux villes les outils et les ressources nécessaires pour transformer leur mentalité locale en un changement systémique de grande portée. L’organisme offre aussi des programmes de formation ciblés et gère des réseaux de leadership afin de s’assurer que les nouvelles pratiques exemplaires en matière de durabilité urbaine ont une incidence maximale. Pour en apprendre davantage, visitez le site ecodistricts.org.

Personnes-ressources d’EcoDistricts pour les médias :

Rob Bennett, au 503-719-2487 ou à l’adresse rob@ecodistricts.org

Adam Beck, au 503-367-1108 ou à l’adresse adam@ecodistricts.org

Gina Binole (GBM Communications), au 503-797-4929 ou à l’adresse gina@gbmcommunications.com

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On June 25th Windmill will be joining forces with our fellow Wellington West dwellers, terra20, to celebrate our shared commitment in offering quality products that lessen the impact on our environment, with a focus on Healthy Interiors.  We will be hosting a compelling and unique opportunity to learn more about enhancing Canada’s green economy. So what will this Healthy Interiors event entail?

Beyond a decadent spread of appetizers, delicious beverages and hand-selected door prizes from terra20, we are elated that Rick Smith, one of the country’s leading environmental campaigners, will be joining us for the evening. In 2009, Rick Smith co-authored the bestseller book Slow Death by Rubber Duck in which he examines the toxicity of everyday household items presented in a comedic, yet eye-opening series of experiments. Smith investigates various detoxification methods in his 2013 book, Toxin, Toxout that has been reviewed as a “truly indispensable and enlightening guide to living in the 21st century”.

We hope you can join us.

Wednesday June 25, 2014

5:00-7:00 pm

Windmill’s Presentation Centre at 440 Sparks Street (corner of Bronson)

 Please RSVP by June 23,  to terra20@terra20.com

 

terra-20-logo-final-nov24      toxin-toxout-logo_03

 

 

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Ottawa community information session on Domtar Lands set for June 24

Gatineau session to take place in the fall

Ottawa, June 11, 2014 – The City of Ottawa andWindmill Development Group are inviting the public to attend a community information session on plans for the former Domtar Lands, Tuesday, June 24 from 5:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. at the Canadian War Museum.

Given the location of the property, two municipal jurisdictions are responsible for the rezoning of the lands: the City of Ottawa and la Ville de Gatineau. Each jurisdiction has different development application processes and requirements for public consultation. The Ville de Gatineau public meeting will follow in the fall after the City’s technical review is completed and will be the third community information session to be held on the project.

“We are very eager to meet with residents and stakeholders and to hear their thoughts on the plans we presented in April,” said Jonathan Westeinde, co-founder of the Windmill Development Group. “We were blown away by the number of people who attended our first consultation in December. We hope to see a similar level of engagement this time around.”

Through historically and environmentally sensitive redevelopment, Windmill, one of Canada’s greenest developers, plans to build the world’s most sustainable community on the Chaudière and Albert Islands, and downtown Gatineau riverfront.

The event is open to media.

Key facts

  •  Windmill Development Group signed an agreement to purchase the Ottawa and Gatineau lands from Domtar on December 4, 2013
  • A first public consultation was held at the Canadian Museum of Civilization on December 11, 2013.
  • Windmill’s development applications were submitted to the City of Ottawa and la Ville de Gatineau on April 22nd, 2014. Additional information can be found on the City of Ottawa’s website at ottawa.ca/devapps under 3 or 4 Booth Street.

Naming contest

The public has until midnight on June 30th to submit name suggestions for the new community. To submit a name, visit our contest webpage or bring your suggestion to the public consultation meeting.

The winner will enjoy a one-week stay at one of Windmill’s luxury Whitewater Village cottages.

About Windmill

Windmill is a visionary company dedicated to transforming conventional development practices by ensuring that exemplary ecological, social and financial returns are achieved in all their projects. Every Windmill development is conceived, designed and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and our ecosystem. Windmill is the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Completed projects include The Currents, a performing arts centre and modern condominium tower in Ottawa’s Wellington West neighbourhood, and Dockside Green, a model sustainable community in Victoria that was named one of 16 Clinton Climate Initiative Climate Positive developments.

 For information:

Annie Boucher                 613.863.3702

boucher@fusecommunications.ca

To read the News Release regarding our rezoning application of this site submitted on April 22, 2014, click here

 

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Séance d’information communautaire sur les terrains de Domtar prévue le 24 juin

La séance pour les résidents de Gatineau aura lieu à l’automne.

Ottawa, 11 juin 2014 – La Ville d’Ottawa et leGroupe Développements Windmill invitent le public à une séance d’information communautaire sur les plans de transformation des anciens terrains de Domtar le mardi 24 juin de 17 h à 21 h, au Musée canadien de la guerre.

 En raison de l’emplacement de ces terrains, deux administrations municipales sont responsables du changement de zonage : la Ville d’Ottawa et la Ville de Gatineau. Chaque administration a différents processus de demande d’aménagement et différentes exigences en matière de consultation publique. La séance d’information pour les résidents de Gatineau aura lieu à l’automne, dès que la Ville aura terminé son examen technique. Il s’agira de la troisième séance d’information communautaire dans le cadre du projet.

« Nous sommes très impatients de rencontrer les résidents et les intervenants et de connaître leur opinion au sujet des plans que nous avons présentés en avril dernier », a indiqué Jonathan Westeinde, cofondateur du Groupe Développement Windmill. « Nous avons été renversés par le nombre de personnes qui ont assisté à notre première consultation publique en décembre 2013. Nous espérons que le taux de participation sera semblable pour cette prochaine séance d’information. »

Par l’intermédiaire d’un nouveau développement immobilier soucieux de l’histoire et de l’environnement, Windmill, un des promoteurs immobiliers les plus écologiques du Canada, envisage de construire la communauté la plus durable au monde sur les îles Chaudière et Albert ainsi qu’aux abords de la rivière des Outaouais près du centre-ville de Gatineau.

Les représentants des médias peuvent assister à la séance.

Faits saillants

  •  Le 4 décembre 2013, le Groupe Développement Windmill a signé une entente d’achat pour les terrains de Domtar situés à Ottawa et Gatineau.
  • Une première consultation publique a été tenue au Musée canadien des civilisations le 11 décembre 2013.
  • Les demandes d’aménagement de Windmill ont été envoyées à la Ville d’Ottawa et la Ville de Gatineau le 22 avril 2014. Des renseignements supplémentaires se trouvent sur le site Web de la Ville d’Ottawa (http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/home.jsf?lang=fr, sous « 3 Booth Street » ou « 4 Booth Street »).

Concours pour nommer le projet

Le public a jusqu’à minuit le 30 juin pour envoyer des suggestions de nom pour la nouvelle communauté. Pour ce faire, visitez la page Web de notre concours ou apportez votre suggestion à la consultation publique.

Le prix est un séjour d’une semaine dans l’un des luxueux chalets de Whitewater Village de Windmill.

Au sujet de Windmill

Windmill est une entreprise immobilière visionnaire, qui se consacre à la transformation des pratiques de développement traditionnelles en adoptant, pour tous ses projets, une approche exemplaire axée sur l’environnement, les gens et les profits. Tous les développements de Windmill sont conçus et construits en vue de protéger et d’améliorer la communauté locale et notre écosystème. Windmill est le seul promoteur immobilier en Amérique du Nord à obtenir la certification LEED platine pour tous ses projets à usages mixtes. Les projets terminés comprennent The Currents, un centre d’art de la scène et une tour de condominiums modernes situés dans le quartier Wellington ouest d’Ottawa, et Dockside Green, une communauté durable modèle à Victoria, qui a été officiellement reconnue comme étant l’un des 16 développements à rendement positif sur le climat dans le cadre de la Clinton Climate Initiative.

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements :

Annie Boucher                 613.863.3702

boucher@fusecommunications.ca

Pour lire le communiqué concernant notre demande de modification de zonage pour ce site, déposée le 22 avril 2014, cliquez ici

 

 

 

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From now until midnight, June 30, 2014, you can submit suggestions for a name, along with a brief rationale, for our redevelopment of the lands surrounding the Chaudière Falls. Enter our naming contest today and you could win a one-week stay at one of our luxury Whitewater Village cottage.

Click here for contest details

Submit your suggestion here

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Vous avez jusqu’à minuit le 30 juin 2014 pour suggérer un nom pour le projet de réaménagement des terrains entourant les chutes de la Chaudière. Chaque suggestion doit être accompagnée d’une brève justification. En participant au concours, vous courez la chance de gagner un séjour d’une semaine dans l’un de nos luxueux chalets de Whitewater Village.

Cliquez ici pour les détails du concours

Soumettez votre suggestion ici

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Windmill Submits Rezoning Application for Domtar Lands

Developer presents plan for transforming the industrial site into the world’s most sustainable community

Ottawa, April 22, 2014 – Windmill Development Group today took the next step in its plans to transform the industrial brownfield site on Chaudière and Albert Islands and adjacent riverfront in downtown Gatineau into an accessible and breathtaking sustainability showpiece for the region. Windmill submitted its plans today to the City of Ottawa and la Ville de Gatineau as part of its application for the rezoning of the lands into a mixed-use community-scale sustainable development.

“We felt Earth Day was the perfect time to present our plan for transforming this historic, yet dormant, piece of land into what we hope will be the world’s most sustainable community,” says Jonathan Westeinde, managing partner, Windmill Development Group.

Key features of the rezoning application include:

  • An ambitious sustainability plan using the One Planet Community framework
  • Development of a series of new plazas and parks
  • Mixed-use properties including retail amenities, restaurants, commercial and residential
  • Preservation of key heritage buildings for cultural, commercial and retail uses
  • Public access to the previously fenced-off Chaudière Falls
  • Stunning new public viewpoints of our national symbols

“Our rezoning application delivers on the eight design principles we shared with the public and interested parties late last year,” says Windmill partner Rodney Wilts. “We plan to bring new life and energy to this once bustling heart of industry, and to do it through historically and environmentally sensitive redevelopment.”

 To develop its plan, Windmill held a sustainability charrette (workshop) with 70+ interested parties, including the Riverkeeper, Ecology Ottawa, Heritage Canada Foundation, First Nations representatives and more; visited the greenest communities in Europe; and, hosted dozens of specific engagements with First Nations groups, heritage and cultural advocates, sustainability proponents, and business and tourism experts. This, in addition to holding a public meeting where more than 900 residents came to view and provide feedback on the developer’s design principles for the land.

Given the site’s unique and prominent location, the City of Ottawa, la Ville de Gatineau and the National Capital Commission coordinated the first-ever joint design review panel.  This panel, consisting of design expertise from across the country, provided glowing endorsement of the proposal.

“This project appears to have captured the hearts and imagination of the community,” says Westeinde. “We will use the plans presented today as a springboard for further consultation and engagement with the public and stakeholders. None of this is final yet.”

Windmill will host another public meeting in the months to come. It is also asking the public to help name the site by entering the #ReimagineChaudiere contest at www.windmilldevelopment.com. The selected name will be announced this summer and the winner will win a one-week’s stay at Windmill’s Whitewater Village luxury cottage community.

 Media availability and tour of the site

Media is invited to conduct interviews with Windmill on its plans, and to take part in a short tour the site this afternoon at 1:00p.m. You can enter at 6, Booth Street and follow the signs and park at the meeting spot on Albert Island (directly behind the War Museum).

About Windmill

Windmill is a visionary company dedicated to transforming conventional development practices by ensuring that exemplary ecological, social and financial returns are achieved in all their projects. Every Windmill development is conceived, designed and constructed to protect and enhance the local community and our ecosystem. Windmill is the only developer in North America to have achieved LEED Platinum on all its mixed-use projects. Completed projects include The Currents, a performing arts centre and modern condominium tower in Ottawa’s Wellington West neighbourhood, and Dockside Green, a model sustainable community in Victoria that was named one of 16 Clinton Climate Initiative Climate Positive developments.

 For information:

Annie Boucher

613-863-3702 (voice and SMS)

boucher@fusecommunications.ca

@aboucherfuse

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Windmill envoie sa demande de changement de zonage pour les terrains de Domtar

Le promoteur immobilier présente le plan de transformation d’un site industriel en la communauté la plus durable au monde

Ottawa, 22 avril 2014 – Le Groupe Développements Windmill entame aujourd’hui les prochaines étapes de son projet visant à transformer la friche industrielle située sur les îles Chaudière et Albert ainsi que les berges adjacentes situées près du centre-ville de Gatineau en un chef-d’œuvre de durabilité accessible et remarquable. Windmill a envoyé ses plans aujourd’hui à la Ville d’Ottawa et à la Ville de Gatineau, dans le cadre de sa demande de changement de zonage des terrains en un développement communautaire durable à usages mixtes.

« Nous sommes d’avis que le Jour de la Terre est la date parfaite pour présenter notre plan visant à transformer le site historique inutilisé en ce que nous espérons sera la communauté la plus durable au monde », affirme Jonathan Westeinde, associé directeur du Groupe Développements Windmill.

Principaux éléments de la demande de changement de zonage :

  • Plan de durabilité ambitieux reposant sur le cadre One Planet Community
  • Création de nouveaux parcs et lieux publics
  • Propriétés à usages mixtes, notamment des commerces de vente au détail, des restaurants, des boutiques et des résidences
  • Préservation des immeubles patrimoniaux clés à des fins culturelles et commerciales
  • Accès public aux chutes Chaudière, dont l’entrée était auparavant clôturée
  • Superbes vues accessibles au public, qui pourra admirer nos symboles nationaux

« Notre demande de changement zonage est axée sur les huit principes de conception que nous avons communiqués aux parties visées à la fin de l’année dernière », indique Rodney Wilts, associé chez Windmill. « Nous prévoyons insuffler la vitalité et l’énergie qui caractérisait jadis ce centre industriel de la région, et ce, par l’intermédiaire d’un développement immobilier respectueux de l’histoire du site et de l’environnement. »

 Pour établir le plan, Windmill a tenu une séance de travail intense (atelier) sur la durabilité avec plus de 70 parties intéressées, notamment Sentinelle Outaouais, Écologie Ottawa, la fondation Héritage Canada, des représentants des Premières nations. Nous avons visité les communautés les plus écologiques de l’Europe et nous avons organisé des dizaines de rencontres avec les groupes des Premières nations, des défenseurs du patrimoine et de la culture, des spécialistes de la durabilité, du commerce et du tourisme. De plus, nous avons tenu une consultation publique, à laquelle ont assisté plus de 900 participants, afin de connaître les opinions et les commentaires des résidents quant aux principes de conception.

En raison de l’emplacement unique et stratégique, la Ville d’Ottawa, la Ville de Gatineau et la Commission de la capitale nationale ont coordonné le tout premier comité de révision mixte. Ce comité, composé de spécialistes de la conception venant des quatre coins du pays, a formulé une excellente recommandation à l’égard de notre proposition.

« Le projet semble avoir parfaitement saisi les valeurs et l’imagination de la communauté », précise M. Westeinde. « Nous utiliserons les plans présentés aujourd’hui comme tremplin en vue des prochaines consultations et des engagements auprès du public et des intervenants. Rien n’est définitif encore. »

Windmill organisera une autre consultation publique au cours des mois à venir. Le Groupe demande également au public de l’aider à nommer le site en participant au concours #RéinventerChaudière. Le nom retenu sera annoncé cet été, et le gagnant recevra un séjour d’une semaine dans un des luxueux chalets de Whitewater Village, une œuvre de Windmill.

 Point de presse et visite du site aujourd’hui

Cet après-midi, à 13 h, les médias sont invités à effectuer des entrevues avec les représentants de Windmill au sujet des plans et aussi pour faire une courte visite du site. L’entrée du site se trouve au 6, rue Booth. Vous n’avez qu’à suivre les affiches et à stationner votre véhicule au point de rassemblement sur l’île Albert (directement derrière le Musée de la guerre).

Au sujet de Windmill

Windmill est une entreprise immobilière visionnaire, qui se consacre à la transformation des pratiques de développement traditionnelles en adoptant, pour tous ses projets, une approche exemplaire axée sur l’environnement, les gens et les profits. Tous les développements de Windmill sont conçus et construits en vue de protéger et d’améliorer la communauté locale et notre écosystème. Windmill est le seul promoteur immobilier en Amérique du Nord à obtenir la certification LEED platine pour tous ses projets à usages mixtes. Les projets terminés comprennent The Currents, un centre d’art de la scène et une tour de condominiums modernes situés dans le quartier Wellington Ouest à Ottawa, et Dockside Green, une communauté durable modèle à Victoria, qui a été officiellement reconnue comme étant l’un des 16 développements à rendement positif sur le climat dans le cadre de la Clinton Climate Initiative.

 Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements :

 Annie Boucher

613-863-3702 (téléphone ou SMS)

boucher@fusecommunications.ca

@aboucherfuse

 

 

 

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